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ZFS compression: yes, you want this

Published by Jim Salter // February 24th, 2015


So ZFS dedup is a complete lose. What about compression?

Compression is a hands-down win. LZ4 compression should be on by default for nearly anything you ever set up under ZFS. I typically have LZ4 on even for datasets that will house database binaries… yes, really. Let’s look at two quick test runs, on a Xeon E3 server with 32GB ECC RAM and a pair of Samsung 850 EVO 1TB disks set up as a mirror vdev.

This is an inline compression torture test: we’re reading pseudorandom data (completely incompressible) and writing it to an LZ4 compressed dataset.

root@lab:/data# pv < in.rnd > incompressible/out.rnd
7.81GB 0:00:22 [ 359MB/s] [==================================>] 100%

root@lab:/data# zfs get compressratio data/incompressible
NAME                 PROPERTY       VALUE  SOURCE
data/incompressible  compressratio  1.00x  -

359MB/sec write… yyyyyeah, I’d say LZ4 isn’t hurting us too terribly here – and this is a worst case scenario. What about something a little more realistic? Let’s try again, this time with a raw binary of my Windows Server 2012 R2 “gold” image (the OS is installed and Windows Updates are applied, but nothing else is done to it):

root@lab:/data/test# pv < win2012r2-gold.raw > realworld/win2012r2-gold.out
8.87GB 0:00:17 [ 515MB/s] [==================================>] 100%

Oh yeah – 515MB/sec this time. Definitely not hurting from using our LZ4 compression. What’d we score for a compression ratio?

root@lab:/data# zfs get compressratio data/realworld
NAME            PROPERTY       VALUE  SOURCE
data/realworld  compressratio  1.48x  -

1.48x sounds pretty good! Can we see some real numbers on that?

root@lab:/data# ls -lh /data/realworld/win2012r2-gold.raw
-rw-rw-r-- 1 root root 8.9G Feb 24 18:01 win2012r2-gold.raw
root@lab:/data# du -hs /data/realworld
6.2G	/data/realworld

8.9G of data in 6.2G of space… with sustained writes of 515MB/sec.

What if we took our original 8G of incompressible data, and wrote it to an uncompressed dataset?

root@lab:/data#  zfs create data/uncompressed
root@lab:/data# zfs set compression=off data/uncompressed
root@lab:/data# cat 8G.in > /dev/null ; # this is to make sure our source data is preloaded in the ARC
root@lab:/data# pv < 8G.in > uncompressed/8G.out
7.81GB 0:00:21 [ 378MB/s] [==================================>] 100% 

So, our worst case scenario – completely incompressible data – means a 5% performance hit, and a more real-world-ish scenario – copying a Windows Server installation – means a 27% performance increase. That’s on fast solid state, of course; the performance numbers will look even better on slower storage (read: spinning rust), where even worst-case writes are unlikely to slow down at all.

Yep, that’s a win.

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